Snus As A Gateway To Smoking And Other Tobacco Products

post details top
Feb 24th, 2015
post details top
Snus As A Gateway To Smoking And Other Tobacco Products

Snus: smokeless tobacco. This tobacco product has risen in popularity in recent years, and is heavily used in Sweden and Norway as a substitute for smoking. Also pronounced either snoose or snooze, the product is quite different than snuff, as there is no need to spit. Many believe it is a beneficial substitute for those who want to quit smoking, as snus delivers the nicotine. No smoke is involved, and there is no irritation, inflammation or damage to your lungs. Unfortunately snus has big health drawbacks. A recent study established that snus can be a gateway to smoking or the use of other types of tobacco products for young people who use the product.

Snus contains nicotine, a highly addictive substance. If you use snus, you ARE addicted to nicotine. Once addicted, the craving can lead you to smoke just that one cigarette, and then another, and before long you are a smoker. Beyond the risk of becoming a user of other tobacco products, snus carries some serious health risks, including an increased risk of oral cancer, pancreatic cancer and cancer of the esophagus. Snus is manufactured in a manner that reduces certain dangerous chemical compounds, which is an advantage. The disadvantage is that snus still contains a significant quantity of these cancer-causing chemicals.

Study Reveals That Adolescent Snus At Three Times The Risk of Becoming Smokers

A study of Swedish and Norwegian snus users has established that those who use it are far more likely to develop pancreatic cancer. The substance is also now linked to mouth sores, heart attacks, strokes and an increased risk of diabetes. A recent study monitored about 1,000 Swedish adolescents for five years as they progressed through school. The Swedish youths that used snus were proven to be three times more likely to become smokers after leaving school. The substance has been touted as a way for people to quit smoking – but is the opposite true, particularly for young users?

This study, conducted by Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden has clearly revealed that there are hidden health dangers in the use of snus that extend beyond the inherent risks in the product itself. While many believe there are significant health advantages to using snus over cigarettes, if the eventual outcome is likely to be a smoker, the concept may prove to be seriously flawed. A lead researcher believes schools should address this issue in part by altering the campaign from having a “smoke-free” campus to “tobacco-free” campus to reduce the risk of turning out higher numbers of young smokers.

Teenagers tend to feel immortal, and don’t consider the long-term impact on health in what they are doing. Outlawing the use of any tobacco product on school grounds could be part of the answer to the high numbers of young people who continue to become nicotine addicts. In the USA, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) reports that in 2012, 23.3% of high school students are estimated to be using tobacco products – almost one-quarter of this age group. The statistical breakdown of the types of products used is as follows: cigarettes at 14.0%, cigars at 12.6%, smokeless tobacco at 6.4%, hookahs at 5.4%, pipes at 4.5%, electronic cigarettes at 2.8% and snus currently at 2.5%.

Source:

An Overview On Lung Cancer

post details top
Dec 20th, 2013
post details top

Most of us are aware that smoking greatly increases your risk of developing serious illnesses. One of the most common diseases associated with tobacco use is lung cancer. Exposure to tobacco smoke, either firsthand or secondhand, can greatly heighten your risk level. While there are a variety of treatments available, one of the most effective ways to lower your chances of developing lung cancer is to quit smoking.

Are There Different Types of Lung Cancer?

According to LungCancer.org, there are two different types of lung cancer: small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell comprises the vast majority. Squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinomas and adenocarcinoma are three different types of tumors that are associated with non-small cell lung cancer.
Small cell lung cancer grows quicker and moves throughout the body faster than non-small cell lung cancer. This type is almost exclusively caused by exceptionally heavy smoking habits.

What Are Some of the Signs or Symptoms?

According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms of lung cancer typically do not appear in the disease’s early stages. Some of the warning signs that can point to lung cancer include the following:

  • Coughing Up Blood
  • Persistent Coughing
  • Weight Loss
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Head or Chest Pain

What Are The Treatment Options?

Depending on what stage the cancer is in, there are several different types of treatments, which can be combined. The Mayo Clinic cites the following types of treatments:

  • Chemotherapy
  • Drug Therapy
  • Radiation Therapy
  • Surgery

How Can I Reduce The Risk Of Developing This Type of Lung Disease?

To help lower your risk, it’s a good idea to give up smoking for good. This will not only decrease your chances for developing other serious, chronic diseases, but it will also benefit the people around you. Regular exercise can also help with your overall wellness.

The Connection between Smoking and Vitamin C Deficiency

post details top
Oct 20th, 2013
post details top
The Connection between Smoking and Vitamin C Deficiency

Vitamin C is an important part of your daily dietary intake. Humans must obtain vitamin C from food and other sources, since the body cannot synthesize it spontaneously. While getting enough vitamin C is usually quite effortless for the average healthy person, smokers are more prone to vitamin C deficiency. Here’s a look at why this is the case.

Getting Enough Vitamin C

According to the Office of Dietary Supplements, the recommended daily value for vitamin C intake is 90 mg for adult men and 75 mg (or more if pregnant or breastfeeding) for adult women. Smokers of both genders require 35 mg more vitamin C per day.

A severe form of vitamin C deficiency is called scurvy. However, the Office of Dietary Supplements states that this only develops if vitamin C intake falls below 10 mg per day for many weeks. Since citrus fruit and several types of vegetables have around 50 mg or more of vitamin C per serving, scurvy is incredibly rare in developed countries.

(more…)

An Overview About Emphysema

post details top
Oct 8th, 2013
post details top

Most people know that smoking can increase the chances of developing life-threatening diseases. Emphysema is one such example caused by smoking. According to the Mayo Clinic, emphysema affects pulmonary function by ruining the air sacs within the lungs. This damage cannot be reversed.

What Are The Symptoms of This Disease?

According to the Ohio State University Medical Center, shortness of breath is the most common sign of emphysema. Since emphysema prevents the lung’s air sacs, or alveoli, from expanding or contracting, it is much more difficult for a person to take in oxygen. Additional symptoms can include tiredness, cardiac problems, difficulty sleeping, coughing, and depression.

Because emphysema is a chronic disease (which means that it develops overtime), many smokers can already have emphysema without having noticeable signs of the disease. If you have been a long-time tobacco user and have developed these symptoms, be sure to make an appointment with your doctor.

(more…)

Smoking and Your Teeth

post details top
Jul 17th, 2013
post details top
Smoking and Your Teeth

Most people know that smoking can cause serious problems to your respiratory and cardiovascular system. Heart attacks, strokes, COPD and asthma are some of the more common diseases that have all been linked to long-term tobacco use. But it’s not just your lungs and heart that suffer from the repeated use of tobacco. When it comes to your mouth and teeth, tobacco can create a lot of problems.

What Smoking Does To Your Teeth

According to WebMD, bad breath, stained teeth and white spots inside the mouth known as leukoplakia are just a few of the minor oral problems that are attributed to smoking. Any type of tobacco product can cause the teeth to decay. When the teeth are constantly exposed to tobacco, tartar can develop and eat away at the tooth’s enamel. If untreated, tooth decay can cause severe discomfort and even lead to an infection.

(more…)

All About E-Cigarettes

post details top
Jun 22nd, 2013
post details top
All About E-Cigarettes

Electronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes) have started to become a popular product, touted as a safe alternative to the traditional cigarette. Unlike traditional cigarettes that give off harmful second hand smoke, e-cigarettes give off a vapor that supposedly lacks the dangerous chemicals found in conventional cigarettes. The FDA has not officially reviewed these products, so it is unclear if electronic cigarettes are as safe as they claim to be.

What Is An Electronic Cigarette?

According to Medical News Today, an e-cigarette is made up of the following devices:

  • Rechargeable Battery
  • Atomizer — Used to heat liquid to create vapor.
  • Cartridge (or mouthpiece)
  • E-Liquid — Propylene glycol (a safe food additive) and flavoring, which can include nicotine.

(more…)

« Previous Entries

Search